Campo alla Sughera, Superiore 2009

Vindetaljer
  • Alkoholhalt 14%

”Game, grilled meats, mature cheeses, and creative Tuscan cuisine such as crepes with a pecorino fondue and mushrooms, wild boar with blueberries, and Cinta Senese ham with glazed cavolo nero.”

Campo alla Sughera, Superiore 2009

Vintage Production area: The grapes come exclusively from the vineyards on the Campo alla Sughera estate, which is located in the heart of the area with the “Bolgheri” designation of origin.
Grapes: Cabernet Sauvignon (40%), Cabernet Franc (20%), Merlot (20%) and Petit Verdot (20%). Alcohol by volume: 14%.
Harvest: By hand, with 15 kg of grapes in each box.
Winemaking technique: The height of the winery is used to harness the force of gravity and move the grapes, musts and wines. After destemming and gentle pressing, fermentation and maceration are carried out in steel tanks for approximately 12 to 15 days at a temperature no higher than 30°C. The wine is then decanted into barriques, where malolactic fermentation takes place. Ageing: 80% of the wine is aged in new French oak barriques and 20% in previously used ones for at least 18 months. It is then aged in the bottle for more than 12 months.
Characteristics
Colour: Deep ruby red.
Aroma: Refined, expansive and very complex. There are notes of red and black fruit (blackberries, blueberries and strawberries) and a harmonious blend of bell pepper, sweet liquorice and vanilla.
Taste: Mellifluous, balanced, smooth and elegant, with refined, velvety tannins. Suggestions for an ideal tasting experience: Open the bottle at least half an hour beforehand and serve at a temperature of 18°C in large crystal glasses, whether the weather is cool or warm. Excellent in the summer too, if served at the right temperature.
Pairings: Game, grilled meats, mature cheeses, and creative Tuscan cuisine such as crepes with a pecorino fondue and mushrooms, wild boar with blueberries, and Cinta Senese ham with glazed cavolo nero.
Notes on the vintage: The conditions were conducive to high quality, with a naturally very low output. The grapes remained in a superb state of health until the harvest, with very thick skins that were full of fine properties. The resulting wines were very well balanced and concentrated, with great potential for long-term ageing.